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We all know winter is well underway or at the very least, on its way, when the winds of November hit us.

While we may consider winterizing our homes with weather stripping or other methods of making sure that our house and we winter well, do we remember the other aspects of our home that require winterization? Your garden needs some winterizing too, as well as your indoor garden or houseplants and sometimes we neglect that.

Depending on what gardening zone you live in there are various chores that need to be undertaken this time of year, and November is the recommended month to do those chores to assure that your plants and gardens do well next spring.

If you aren’t sure what hardiness zone your area falls under, the map below will help you to determine that, or if you would like a larger version, take a look at the National Arboretum, or the USDA whose map of zones can also help you to determine that.

Recommendations for things that you need to accomplish according to your zone, provided by Santa Rosa Gardens are as follows:

Zone 1

Thin dense-growing trees to avoid wind damage Apply mulch around plants after ground freezes Cut back chrysanthemums after bloom; mulch heavily or dig and store in basement or garage. Set up burlap screens on windward sides of choice shrubs prune deciduous trees and roses after leaves have fallen.

Zone 2

Cut back on feeding houseplants (do not feed dormant houseplants).

Zone 3

Cut back on feeding houseplants (do not feed dormant houseplants) Pot an indoor Amaryllis for Holiday flowering.

Zone 4

Cover perennial, vegetable, bulb, and strawberry beds for winter
Plant winter- and spring-flowering bulbs
Divide and replant crowded fall-blooming bulbs after leaves yellow
Buy spring-blooming bulbs
Pot an indoor Amaryllis for Holiday flowering
Cut back on feeding houseplants (do not feed dormant houseplants)
Protect roses for winter.

Zone 5

Plant winter- and spring-flowering bulbs
Divide and replant crowded fall-blooming bulbs after leaves yellow
Buy winter- and spring-blooming bulbs
Pot an indoor Amaryllis for Holiday flowering
Cut back on feeding houseplants (do not feed dormant houseplants)
Protect roses for winter.

Zone 6

Start fall compost pile
Plant winter- and spring-flowering bulbs
Divide and replant crowded fall-blooming bulbs after leaves yellow
Buy winter- and spring-blooming bulbs
Pot an indoor Amaryllis for Holiday flowering
Cut back on feeding houseplants (do not feed dormant houseplants)
Protect roses for winter.

Zone 7

Plant ornamental trees
Pot an indoor Amaryllis for Holiday flowering
Cover perennial, vegetable, bulb, and strawberry beds for winter
Plant winter- and spring-flowering bulbs
Pre-chill tulips and hyacinths for indoor forcing
Cut back on feeding houseplants (do not feed dormant houseplants)
Rake lawn to remove debris
Protect roses for the winter
Prune fall- and winter-flowering shrubs during or just after bloom
Prune hardy deciduous and evergreen shrubs and vines
Protect tender plants from frost.

Zone 8

Lightly cover perennial, vegetable, bulb, and strawberry beds for winter
Plant winter- and spring-flowering bulbs
Cut back on feeding houseplants (do not feed dormant houseplants)
Plant or repair lawns
Plant ornamental grasses
Plant winter-blooming perennials
Plant bare-root roses
Pot an indoor Amaryllis for Holiday flowering
Plant bare-root trees, shrubs, and vines
Prune fall- and winter-blooming shrubs and vines after bloom
Plant cool-season or winter vegetable seedlings
Sow seeds for cool-season or winter vegetables.

Zone 9

Plant for winter color with annuals
Plant winter- and spring-flowering bulbs
Plant winter- and spring-flowering shrubs
Plant ornamental grasses
Repot cacti and succulents, if essential, once they have finished blooming
Pot an indoor Amaryllis for Holiday flowering
Plant bare-root fruit trees
Plant citrus
Cut back on feeding houseplants (do not feed dormant houseplants)
Repair or plant lawns
Rake lawns to remove debris
Sow frost-tolerant perennials indoors
Plant winter-blooming perennials
Plant bare-root roses
Plant bare-root trees, shrubs, and vines
Prune deciduous trees
Prune fall- and winter-flowering shrubs and vines just after bloom
Plant seedlings of cool-season or winter vegetables
Sow seeds for cool-season or winter vegetables
Protect tender plants from frost.

Zone 10

Set out winter-blooming annuals
Plant winter- and spring-flowering bulbs
Repot cacti and succulents, if essential, once they have finished blooming
Plant bare-root fruit trees
Pot an indoor Amaryllis for Holiday flowering
Plant citrus
Cut back on feeding houseplants (do not feed dormant houseplants)
Plant winter-blooming perennials
Plant bare-root roses
Plant bare-root shrubs and vines
Prune fall- and winter-flowering shrubs and vines just after bloom
Plant bare-root trees
Sow cool-season or winter vegetable seeds.

Zone 11

Purchase living Christmas tree (but don’t bring it indoors until a week -or less- before Christmas)
Pot an indoor Amaryllis for Holiday flowering
Plan next year’s garden
Clean and oil garden tools
Drain and winterize garden mechanical equipment according to manufacturer’s instructions
When you bring in the living Christmas tree, keep it away from heating registers
Keep gift plants in a cool, light place. Slit foil at bottom of pot to keep roots from drowning.

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